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Infant children are attuned to the voice of their parents, but a new study shows that genetic instinct might also make them uniquely responsive to some animal calls tooInfant children are attuned to the voice of their parents, but a new study shows that genetic instinct might also make them uniquely responsive to some animal calls too. Researchers from Northwestern University have found that human infants respond uniquely to lemur calls for the first few months of their life. For the study, a group of 3 to 6 months old infants were shown images while being played the sound of either a human, a lemur, an artificial sound, or human voices played backwards. Professor of cognitive psychology at Northwestern University and co-author of the study Sandra Waxman said the infant subjects in the study “were doing some much fancier cognitive dancing during the lemur and human vocalization than in the case of backward speech or tones.” Before the babies reached six months, they responded to the lemur and the human sounds played forward similarly, but when they got to be six months old, they responded that way to the human sounds played forward only. Although the results of the study show a potential connection between primate sounds and the linguistic instinct of infants, some experts don’t think that there is sufficient evidence to support this claim.